Top CyberSecurity News for November 11th 2016

  1. Russian banks floored by DDoS attacksFrom The Register. 

    At least five Russian banks weathered days-long DDoS attacks this week.

    A wave of assaults began on Tuesday afternoon and continued over the next two days. Victims include Sberbank and Alfabank, both of which confirmed DDoS attacks on their online services, RT reports.

    The attacks were powered by compromised IoT devices, according to an unnamed Russian Central Bank official. Early indications are that the Mirai IoT botnet which disrupted DNS services for scores of high-profile websites in October 2016 may be behind the latest attacks but this is unconfirmed.

    The last DDOS attack on this scale against Russian banks was in October 2015, when eight major institutions were targeted.

Top CyberSecurity News For 3rd June 2016

  1. Banking expert warns of potential for ‘really bad’ cyberattackFrom CNBC. Cyberattacks on banks need to be looked at with the same kind of urgency as physical threats, because there is the potential for things to get really bad, banking and cybersecurity expert Ben Lawsky said Wednesday. “We live in a world where each day we are surprised by something new when it comes to the sophistication and the capabilities of hackers,” he said in an interview with CNBC.

  2. There’s a Stuxnet Copycat, and We Have No Idea Where It Came From. From Vice.  After details emerged of Stuxnet, arguably the world’s first digital weapon, there were concerns that other hackers would copy its techniques. Now, researchers have disclosed a piece of industrial control systems (ICS) malware inspired heavily by Stuxnet. Although the copycat malware—dubbed IRONGATE by cybersecurity company FireEye—only works in a simulated environment, it, like Stuxnet, replaces certain types of files, and was seemingly written to target a specific control system configuration.

Top CyberSecurity News For 28th May 2016

  1. North Korea Linked With Hacks Stealing From BanksFrom US News And World Report. Network security researchers have linked cyber attacks that stole millions of dollars from Asian banks to hacking incidents attributed to North Korea, raising questions as to whether the cash-strapped hermit kingdom is seeking new ways to replenish its coffers.

  2. Did the Clinton Email Server Have an Internet-Based Printer?From Krebs On Security. The Associated Press today points to a remarkable footnote in a recent State Department inspector general report on the Hillary Clinton email scandal: The mail was managed from the vanity domain “clintonemail.com.” But here’s a potentially more explosive finding: A review of the historic domain registration records for that domain indicates that whoever built the private email server for the Clintons also had the not-so-bright idea of connecting it to an Internet-based printer. 

Top CyberSecurity News for 17th May 2016

  1. Malware attacks on two banks have links with 2014 Sony Pictures hackFrom CSO Online.  Bangladesh Bank, a commercial bank in Vietnam and Sony Pictures are the unlikely bedfellows in a tale of cyber intrigue uncovered by security researchers at BAE Systems. Researchers Sergei Shevchenko and Adrian Nish have found some links between malware involved in the 2014 attack on Sony Pictures and attacks on two banks involving the theft of credentials for the SWIFT financial transfer network.
  2. How Israel is turning part of the Negev Desert into a cyber-cityFrom Washington Post.  Here in the middle of the Negev Desert, a cyber-city is rising to cement Israel’s place as a major digital power. The new development, an outcropping of glass and steel, will concentrate some of the country’s top talent from the military, academia and business in an area of just a few square miles. No other country is so purposefully integrating its private, scholarly, government and military ­cyber-expertise.
  3. Vietnam bank says interrupted cyber heist using SWIFT messagingFrom Reuters. Vietnam’s Tien Phong Bank said that it interrupted an attempted cyber heist that involved the use of fraudulent SWIFT messages, the same technique at the heart of February’s massive theft from the Bangladesh central bank. Hanoi-based TPBank said in a statement late on Sunday in response to inquiries from Reuters that in the fourth quarter of last year it identified suspicious requests through fraudulent SWIFT messages to transfer more than 1 million euros ($1.1 million) of funds.

Top Cybersecurity News For 24th April 2016

  1. 70 customers duped in cyber hacking of bank. From Times Of India. An internal inquiry by Bank of Baroda (BoB), has found that at least 70 customers from various parts of the Uttar Pradesh state were duped in March. So far, 373 fraudulent transactions adding up to about Rs 10.67 lakh (USD 18,000) have been detected in what could be the biggest cyber heist in India.

  2. Hacking Risks Found in US Army’s $12 Billion Mobile Network. From NewsMax. A $12 billion mobile Internet network that the U.S. Army is using in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Africa has significant cyber-security vulnerabilities that were found in combat testing.
  3. Number of DDoS Bots That Can Bypass Mitigation Tools Rises to 36 Percent. From Softpedia. During the first three months of the year, DDoS protection firm Imperva observed a series of interesting trends regarding the DDoS landscape. According to the company’s latest quarterly report, both network layer and application layer attacks grew in size and sophistication.
  4. Massive Philippines data breach now searchable online. From Wired. A website called wehaveyourdata.com that claims to contain the full database of hacked Filipino voter data has appeared online. The hacking of the Philippines’s voter registration system and database is believed to be the biggest data breach in government history, with more than 55 million people affected.
  5. Facebook bug hunter stumbles on backdoor left by… another bug hunter. From ITWorld. When Orange Tsai set out to participate in Facebook’s bug bounty program in February, he successfully managed to gain access to one of Facebook’s corporate servers. But once in, he realized other hackers had beaten him to it.The backdoor script stole Facebook employee credentials from a corporate server.