Top CyberSecurity News for November 11th 2016

  1. Russian banks floored by DDoS attacksFrom The Register. 

    At least five Russian banks weathered days-long DDoS attacks this week.

    A wave of assaults began on Tuesday afternoon and continued over the next two days. Victims include Sberbank and Alfabank, both of which confirmed DDoS attacks on their online services, RT reports.

    The attacks were powered by compromised IoT devices, according to an unnamed Russian Central Bank official. Early indications are that the Mirai IoT botnet which disrupted DNS services for scores of high-profile websites in October 2016 may be behind the latest attacks but this is unconfirmed.

    The last DDOS attack on this scale against Russian banks was in October 2015, when eight major institutions were targeted.

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Daily CyberSecurity News For 4th November 2016

  1. Mirai botnet attackers are trying to knock an entire country offlineFrom ZDNet. 

One of the largest Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attacks happened this week and almost nobody noticed.

Since the cyberattack on Dyn two weeks ago, the internet has been on edge, fearing another massive attack that would throw millions off the face of the web. The attack was said to be upwards of 1.1Tbps — more than double the attack a few weeks earlier on security reporter Brian Krebs’ website, which was about 620Gbps in size, said to be one of the largest at the time. The attack was made possible by the Mirai botnet, an open-source botnet that anyone can use, which harnesses the power of insecure Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

Daily CyberSecurity News For 2nd November 2016

  1. New, more-powerful IoT botnet infects 3,500 devices in 5 daysFrom ArsTechnica. 

    There’s a new, more powerful Internet-of-things botnet in town, and it has managed to infect almost 3,500 devices in just five days, according to a recently published report.

    Linux/IRCTelnet, as the underlying malware has been named, borrows code from several existing malicious IoT applications. Most notably, it lifts entire sections of source code from Aidra, one of the earliest known IoT bot packages. Aidra was discovered infecting more than 30,000 embedded Linux devices in an audacious and ethically questionable research project that infected more than 420,000 Internet-connected devices in an attempt to measure the security of the global network. As reported by the anonymous researcher, Aidra forced infected devices to carry out a variety of distributed denial-of-service attacks but worked on a limited number of devices.

Top CyberSecurity News For October 13th 2016

  1. IoT Devices as Proxies for CybercrimeFrom KrebsOnSecurity. Multiple stories published here over the past few weeks have examined the disruptive power of hacked “Internet of Things” (IoT) devices such as routers, IP cameras and digital video recorders. This post looks at how crooks are using hacked IoT devices as proxies to hide their true location online as they engage in a variety of other types of cybercriminal activity — from frequenting underground forums to credit card and tax refund fraud.

Top CyberSecurity News For October 8th 2016

  1. We Need to Save the Internet from the Internet of Things. From Motherboard. 

    Brian Krebs is a popular reporter on the cybersecurity beat. He regularly exposes cybercriminals and their tactics, and consequently is regularly a target of their ire. Last month, he wrote about an online attack-for-hire service that resulted in the arrest of the two proprietors. In the aftermath, his site was taken down by a massive DDoS attack.

    In many ways, this is nothing new. Distributed denial-of-service attacks are a family of attacks that cause websites and other internet-connected systems to crash by overloading them with traffic. The “distributed” part means that other insecure computers on the internet—sometimes in the millions—are recruited to a botnet to unwittingly participate in the attack. The tactics are decades old; DDoS attacks are perpetrated by lone hackers trying to be annoying, criminals trying to extort money, and governments testing their tactics. There are defenses, and there are companies that offer DDoS mitigation services for hire.

Top CyberSecurity News For October 3rd 2016

  1. Source Code for IoT Botnet ‘Mirai’ ReleasedFrom Krebs On Security. 

    The source code that powers the “Internet of Things” (IoT) botnet responsible for launching the historically large distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack against KrebsOnSecurity last month has been publicly released, virtually guaranteeing that the Internet will soon be flooded with attacks from many new botnets powered by insecure routers, IP cameras, digital video recorders and other easily hackable devices.

    The leak of the source code was announced Friday on the English-language hacking community Hackforums. The malware, dubbed “Mirai,” spreads to vulnerable devices by continuously scanning the Internet for IoT systems protected by factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords.

Top CyberSecurity News For 20th July 2016

  1. New DDoS Attack Record Is 579 Gbps, Reported in H1 2016From Softpedia. The new peak value for DDoS attacks has changed yet again, with the new top value being 579 Gbps, recorded by Arbor Networks during the first half of the year. The previous maximum value was 500 Gbps, detected between the end of 2015 and the start of 2016, also by Arbor Networks, a company that provides various security services, among which DDoS mitigation.Low-and-slow DDoS attacks account for 80 percent of all DDoS attacks

Top CyberSecurity News For 29th June 2016

  1. A Massive Botnet of CCTV Cameras Involved in Ferocious DDoS AttacksFrom Softpedia. 

    A botnet of over 25,000 bots lies at the heart of recent DDoS attacks that are ferociously targeting business around the world. More exactly, we’re talking about massive Layer 7 DDoS attacks that are overwhelming Web servers, occupying their resources and eventually crashing websites. US-based security vendor Sucuri discovered this botnet, very active in the last few weeks, and they say it’s mainly composed of compromised CCTV systems from around the world. Their first meeting with the botnet came when a jewelry shop that was facing a prolonged DDoS attack opted to move their website behind Sucuri’s main product, its WAF (Web Application Firewall).

  2. New and improved CryptXXX ransomware rakes in $45,000 in 3 weeksFrom ArsTechnica. Whoever said crime doesn’t pay didn’t know about the booming ransomware market. A case in point, the latest version of the scourge known as CryptXXX, which raked in more than $45,000 (£34,344) in less than three weeks. Over the past few months, CryptXXX developers have gone back and forth with security researchers. The whitehats from Kaspersky Lab provided a free tool that allowed victims to decrypt their precious data without paying the ransom, which typically reaches $500 or more. Then, CryptXXX developers would tweak their code to defeat the get-out-of-jail decryptor. The researchers would regain the upper hand by exploiting another weakness and so on.

Top CyberSecurity News For 22nd June 2016

  1. Slicing Into a Point-of-Sale BotnetFrom KrebsOnSecurity. Last week, KrebsOnSecurity broke the news of an ongoing credit card breach involving CiCi’s Pizza, a restaurant chain in the United States with more than 500 locations. What follows is an exclusive look at a point-of-sale botnet that appears to have enslaved dozens of hacked payment terminals inside of CiCi’s locations that are being relieved of customer credit card data in real time.