Top CyberSecurity News For 25th June 2016

  1. U.S. charges Filipino man with hacking accounts of celebritiesFrom Reuters.  A Filipino man has been criminally charged in New Jersey with running a large and sophisticated scheme to hack into the bank and credit card accounts of well-known or celebrity customers, U.S. prosecutors said. According to an indictment made public on Friday, Peter Locsin, 35, conspired with others from February 2012 to January 2015 to compromise accounts belonging to at least five victims at three financial institutions.

  2. SEC Sues UK Man For Hacking US Investors’ AccountsFrom Dark Reading.  The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has filed a case in a US District Court against a UK national accusing him of hacking into the accounts of US investors and carrying out fraudulent trades, reports Reuters. SEC alleges that Idris Dayo Mustapha made a profit of at least $68,000 while costing his victims around $289,000 through these illegal transactions in April and May.

Top CyberSecurity News For 24th May 2016

  1.  Customs invests $1.4M to beef up cybersecurityFrom Manila Bulletin. The Bureau of Custom has invested $1.4 million in a comprehensive cybersecurity program that will protect the government’s second largest tax agency from cybercriminal activities. Customs Commissioner Alberto D. Lina said they partnered with Microsoft Philippines to implement reforms in the agency’s information and communications technology and establish the highest data integrity assurance levels. Lina said Customs is the first government agency to implement a comprehensive cybersecurity program in less than year. Earlier, several government institutions, including the Commission on Elections’ controversial “comeleak,” were targeted by cybercriminals that drastically affected public trust.
  2. Cyber-crooks meet their match with Israeli-developed GPS protectorFrom Times Of Israel. Farr more than a tool for Waze users to figure out the best routes to their destinations, the Global Positioning System is used in a wide variety of endeavors and industries. Among them, to name a few, are agriculture, to help farmers determine the ideal spots to plant crops; shipping, to guide ships across the ocean; retail sales, to help companies keep track of their products; aviation, to ensure that planes are able to get to their destination; and defense, to position systems to ensure response to attack.

  3. ‘Dark Territory: The Secret History of Cyber War’: The worldwide war of keystrokes. From Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  You’ve heard the complaining, from the White House on down, about the cyberattacks on our country. Well, yes, you guessed it: We started it. That’s one of the central thrusts of Fred Kaplan’s “Dark Territory: The Secret History of Cyber War.” Because it pioneered computing, the U.S. intelligence agencies enjoyed decades of dominance over rivals, and even learned how to remotely wreak havoc on, say, the Iranian nuclear program. But because nearly everything in our country is networked, we’re uniquely vulnerable now that the rest of the world has caught up.

Top CyberSecurity News For 29th April 2016

  1. Former Tor developer created malware for the FBI to hack Tor users. From Daily Dot. How does the U.S. government beat Tor, the anonymity software used by millions of people around the world? By hiring someone with experience on the inside. A former Tor Project developer created malware for the Federal Bureau of Investigation that allowed agents to unmask users of the anonymity software.
  2. German nuclear plant infected with computer viruses, operator says. From Reuters. A nuclear power plant in Germany has been found to be infected with computer viruses, but they appear not to have posed a threat to the facility’s operations because it is isolated from the Internet, the station’s operator said on Tuesday. The Gundremmingen plant, located about 120 km (75 miles) northwest of Munich, is run by the German utility RW.

  3. Philippine central bank says foiled attempts to hack its website. From Reuters. The Philippine central bank has foiled attempts to hack its website, its governor said on Thursday amid a warning from global financial network SWIFT about recent multiple cyber fraud incidents targeting its system. SWIFT’S disclosure came as law enforcement authorities in Bangladesh and elsewhere investigated the February cyber theft of $81 million from the Bangladesh central bank account at the New York Federal Reserve Bank.

  4. Qatar National Bank investigating alleged data hack. From Reuters. Qatar National Bank, the largest lender in the Middle East and Africa by assets, is investigating an alleged security breach of data posted online this week that revealed the names and passwords of a large number of customers. A 1.5GB trove of leaked documents includes the bank details, telephone numbers and dates of birth of several journalists for satellite broadcaster Al-Jazeera, supposed members of the ruling al-Thani family and government and defense officials, Doha News website reported.

  5. How These Mormon Women Became Some of the Best Cybersecurity Hackers in the U.S. From Reuters. Sarah Cunha and Laura Wilkinson, two seniors at Brigham Young University, didn’t make it to graduation this year. Instead, the two women spent their grad weekend, April 22-24, fighting hackers and defending a network from malware attacks at the 2016 National Collegiate Cyber Defense Championship (NCCDC). The NCCDC, already in its 11th year, is the Olympics of college-level cyber defense. To qualify for one of the ten slots in the national competition, a school must first beat out all the local competition in a regional showdown.

Top Cybersecurity News For 24th April 2016

  1. 70 customers duped in cyber hacking of bank. From Times Of India. An internal inquiry by Bank of Baroda (BoB), has found that at least 70 customers from various parts of the Uttar Pradesh state were duped in March. So far, 373 fraudulent transactions adding up to about Rs 10.67 lakh (USD 18,000) have been detected in what could be the biggest cyber heist in India.

  2. Hacking Risks Found in US Army’s $12 Billion Mobile Network. From NewsMax. A $12 billion mobile Internet network that the U.S. Army is using in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Africa has significant cyber-security vulnerabilities that were found in combat testing.
  3. Number of DDoS Bots That Can Bypass Mitigation Tools Rises to 36 Percent. From Softpedia. During the first three months of the year, DDoS protection firm Imperva observed a series of interesting trends regarding the DDoS landscape. According to the company’s latest quarterly report, both network layer and application layer attacks grew in size and sophistication.
  4. Massive Philippines data breach now searchable online. From Wired. A website called wehaveyourdata.com that claims to contain the full database of hacked Filipino voter data has appeared online. The hacking of the Philippines’s voter registration system and database is believed to be the biggest data breach in government history, with more than 55 million people affected.
  5. Facebook bug hunter stumbles on backdoor left by… another bug hunter. From ITWorld. When Orange Tsai set out to participate in Facebook’s bug bounty program in February, he successfully managed to gain access to one of Facebook’s corporate servers. But once in, he realized other hackers had beaten him to it.The backdoor script stole Facebook employee credentials from a corporate server.