Top CyberSecurity News for November 11th 2016

  1. Russian banks floored by DDoS attacksFrom The Register. 

    At least five Russian banks weathered days-long DDoS attacks this week.

    A wave of assaults began on Tuesday afternoon and continued over the next two days. Victims include Sberbank and Alfabank, both of which confirmed DDoS attacks on their online services, RT reports.

    The attacks were powered by compromised IoT devices, according to an unnamed Russian Central Bank official. Early indications are that the Mirai IoT botnet which disrupted DNS services for scores of high-profile websites in October 2016 may be behind the latest attacks but this is unconfirmed.

    The last DDOS attack on this scale against Russian banks was in October 2015, when eight major institutions were targeted.

Top CyberSecurity News for November 10th 2016

  1. Russian Hackers Launch Targeted Cyberattacks Hours After Trump’s WinFrom Motherboard. 

Merely a few hours after Donald Trump declared his stunning victory, a group of hackers that is widely believed to be Russian and was involved in the breach of the Democratic National Committee launched a wave of attacks against dozens of people working at universities, think tank tanks, NGOs, and even inside the US government.

Around 9 a.m. ET on Wednesday, the hackers sent a series of phishing emails trying to trick dozens of victims into opening booby-trapped attachments containing malware, and clicking on malicious links, according to security firm Volexity, which observed and reported the five attack waves. The targets work for organizations such as Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty, the Atlantic Council, the RAND Corporation, and the State Department, among others.

Daily CyberSecurity News For 1st November 2016

  1. Was a Trump Server Communicating With Russia? From Slate.com. he greatest miracle of the internet is that it exists—the second greatest is that it persists. Every so often we’re reminded that bad actors wield great skill and have little conscience about the harm they inflict on the world’s digital nervous system. They invent viruses, botnets, and sundry species of malware. There’s good money to be made deflecting these incursions. But a small, tightly knit community of computer scientists who pursue such work—some at cybersecurity firms, some in academia, some with close ties to three-letter federal agencies—is also spurred by a sense of shared idealism and considers itself the benevolent posse that chases off the rogues and rogue states that try to purloin sensitive data and infect the internet with their bugs. “We’re the Union of Concerned Nerds,” in the wry formulation of the Indiana University computer scientist L. Jean Camp.

Daily CyberSecurity News For 31st October 2016

  1. The next president will face a cybercrisis within 100 days, predicts reportFrom CNBC.com. 

    The next president will face a cybercrisis in the first 100 days of their presidency, research firm Forrester predicts in a new report.

     The crisis could come as a result of hostile actions from another country or internal conflict over privacy and security legislation, said Forrester analyst Amy DeMartine, lead author of the firm’s top cybersecurity risks for 2017 report, due to be made public Tuesday.

Top CyberSecurity News For October 24th 2016

  1. American vigilante hacker sends Russia a warningFrom KSAT. 

    An American vigilante hacker — who calls himself “The Jester” — has defaced the website of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in retaliation for attacks on American targets.

    On Friday night, the Jester gained access to the Russian government ministry’s website. And he left a message: Stop attacking Americans.

    “Comrades! We interrupt regular scheduled Russian Foreign Affairs Website programming to bring you the following important message,” he wrote. “Knock it off. You may be able to push around nations around you, but this is America. Nobody is impressed.”

Top CyberSecurity News For October 10th 2016

  1. Apple Watch Banned From Cabinet Meetings Over Spy FearsFrom TechWeek Europe. Ministers have been forbidden to wear the Apple Watch during cabinet meetings due to the risk they could be hacked by Russian agents, according to a report.

    Prime minister Theresa May imposed the new rules following several high-profile hacks that have been blamed on Russia, according to The Telegraph, which cited unnamed sources.

Top CyberSecurity News For September 29th 2016

  1. Guccifer 2.0 and Russia’s hidden agendaFrom SC Magazine. 

    Among the routine stream of network compromises and dumped login credentials this year, one attack stands head and shoulders above the rest for intrigue – the Democratic National Committee (DNC) breach. The hack led to political uproar, a high-level resignation, damaging leaks and, in a complete reversal of the norm, the nation state hackers have become more public since being discovered.

    It is worth starting with a recap. The FBI alerted the DNC to the presence of attackers on their network in April this year, but incident response specialists CrowdStrike found that there were two state-sponsored attackers with access to sensitive emails and data. The investigators assessed the network was first breached in the summer of 2015 and established the attackers had stolen large quantities of emails, campaign documents and donor information. Before the hack was publicly disclosed in mid-June, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange announced the whistle-blowing website had ‘enough evidence’ to indict Hillary Clinton.

Top CyberSecurity News For September 28th 2016

  1. FBI investigating possible hack of Democratic Party staffer cell phonesFrom CNN. 

    The FBI has asked to examine the cell phones of a small number Democratic Party staffers as it investigates a possible hack, law enforcement and Democratic sources told CNN Tuesday.

    The development comes on the same day Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson told lawmakers that 18 states have asked for help in warding off cyberattacks on their electronic voting systems.

Top CyberSecurity News For 30th August 2016

  1. US Suspects Russia Behind Computer Hacking in 2 State Election DatabasesFrom Voice Of America. 

    U.S. officials suspect Russian hackers were responsible for breaking into two state election databases earlier this month.

    “This is the closest we’ve come to tying a recent hack to the Russian government,” one official told NBC News on Monday.

    The FBI has not identified the two U.S. states whose data bases were attacked, but Yahoo News, which first reported the breaches, quoted sources who say Arizona and Illinois were targeted.

    According to Yahoo News, an Illinois election board official said the voter registration system was shut down for 10 days last month after hackers stole personal information on approximately 200,000 voters.

Top CyberSecurity News For 24th August 2016

  1. FBI investigating Russian hack of New York Times reporters, othersFrom CNN.  Hackers thought to be working for Russian intelligence have carried out a series of cyber breaches targeting reporters at The New York Times and other US news organizations, according to US officials briefed on the matter. The intrusions, detected in recent months, are under investigation by the FBI and other US security agencies. Investigators so far believe that Russian intelligence is likely behind the attacks and that Russian hackers are targeting news organizations as part of a broader series of hacks that also have focused on Democratic Party organizations, the officials said.